Welcome to ACCESS

Home of ACCESS Innovation, YMAD, Speak Up for Change, ACCESS U

Educate, Empower, Inspire.

Empowering youth to to create social good.

Welcome to the home of ACCESS Innovation, YMAD (Youth Making a Difference), Speak Up for Change, ACCESS U and more.

Read our latest updates, browse a few of our projects below or learn more about ACCESS.

Cipher

Cipher

Cipher is a code-oriented community for school students in the Peel Region. Teaching code in a social, inspiring, competitive atmosphere. Cipher is the first of it's kind, an innovative way to learn and grow.

Impact Tomorrow Expo 2015

Impact Tomorrow Expo 2015

Impact Tomorrow Expo is an Entrepreneurship Conference and Pitch Competition hosted by youth. ACCESS was a lead Sponsor of the conference, which evolved from the first Impact Tomorrow expo in 2013, started by Mississauga high school students who chose to donate proceeds to ACCESS which is now a mentor of the team.

Youth Making a Difference 6

Youth Making a Difference 6

The sixth Youth Making a Difference Conference was hosted by ACCESS at the Brampton Community Door. The event featured activities, stories and instructions to help students start socially-focused projects. Students worked in smaller groups and produced tangible results. YMAD6 received a Social Good Design Award.

Phil Anth Apparel

Phil Anth Apparel

Phil Anth a humanitarian clothing brand that raises funding and awareness for local causes.

Minga Global

Minga Global

Minga Global’s vision is to unite the humanitarian efforts made by youth in their local and global communities. The organization's mission is to amplify the humanitarian efforts made by youth across the globe through innovative and synchronized events. The youth-led organization was founded in the 2014 school-year and exists in several local schools. In January 2015, ACCESS facilitated a VISIONS Retreat for the organization and continues to mentor the group.

Regional Youth Roundtable

Regional Youth Roundtable

Regional Youth Roundtable, a grassroots initiative bringing together youth-led organizations, alleviating pressures facing minority groups, sharing experiences and advice, and collectively taking action on issues in the community. The Regional Youth Roundtable (RYR) is funded by the Ontario Trillium Foundation’s Youth Opportunities Fund with the Organizational Mentorship of ACCESS. Formally launched in Fall 2014, the the group hopes to offer support towards all youth-led organizations in Peel Region, helping them grow and reach their full potential thanks to collaboration, events and community consultations. ACCESS is providing the RYR team with organizational development and ongoing mentorship, supporting the young leaders in creating change in their community.

Phanuel’s University Education

Phanuel’s University Education

Phanuel (pronounced “fan-well”) is a young man born and raised in Haiti. He was accepted into university, but like most in his situation, he was unable to afford the high costs. With ACCESS funding, Phanuel began studies at Universite Notre Dame d’Haiti (the University of Notre Dame of Haiti) where he studied in the Faculty of Economic, Social and Political Studies for first year. Due to the Earthquake in January 2010, Phanuel has since transferred to a school in Texas, USA where he started in August 2010. He is studying in a four-year BA in Theological Studies at The University of the Americas. Phanuel is highly motivated to receive an education and to return to Haiti to help his country.

Do Good, Better Youth Workshops

Do Good, Better Youth Workshops

Youth leaders and activists will received hands-on learning opportunities from experienced facilitators who have worked with countless youth-led organizations and initiatives across the Greater Toronto Area to build stronger organizations and create greater impact in their communities. The ACCESS Speak Up for Change Workshop Series is funded by the Ontario Trillium Foundation.

Is Frozen Fish Healthy

Fish is low in saturated fat and supplies a good dose of certain nutrients, such as protein, according to the American Heart Association. Fresh fish is available at most supermarkets, but it can be expensive, and you won’t always find the type you’re looking for. Frozen fish is a good alternative.

Frozen Fish Basic Facts

Frozen fish is low in saturated fat and contains omega 3 fatty acids, which can help lower blood pressure and reduce the risk of heart problems, according to the American Heart Association. Fatty fish, such as trout, salmon and mackerel, are your best bet for cheap jerseys china increasing your intake of omega 3 fatty acids. Most fish, such as trout, cod, haddock and salmon, supply small amounts of iron and calcium as well.

Fresh vs. Frozen

Fish that you buy from your grocer’s freezer is frozen as soon as it’s caught. That means that you’re getting all the nutrients you would if you ate that same piece of fish fresh from the water and perhaps even more. Opting for frozen fish also increases the varieties you have available, because you don’t have to wait for your favorite kinds to be in season. Frozen fish is good for the environment, too, because it helps reduce waste and decreases the shipping resources necessary to get it from cheap jerseys water to table as quickly as possible, according to “National Geographic.”

Frozen Fish and Mercury Contamination

While the American Heart wholesale jerseys china Association recommends that people eat fish on a regular basis, certain individuals should proceed with caution when it comes to some types of fish. Food and Drug Administration. Pregnant women and children shouldn’t eat wholesale nhl jerseys these kinds of fish at all. Because mercury has a negative impact on brain and neurological development, these populations should opt for lower mercury varieties such as salmon, tilapia, cod and freshwater trout. Ask your doctor about tuna, because the weekly and monthly limits vary by age and type. For example, most people shouldn’t eat more than 6 ounces of albacore tuna per week, according to the American Heart Association.

Keeping Your Fish Healthy

The American Heart Association recommends that you eat at least two servings of fish each week, and frozen fish counts toward that goal. Choose frozen fish packages that aren’t torn or opened, because open packages can be contaminated with bacteria that might make you sick. Food and Drug Administration.Articles Connexes: